Christian

David and Bathsheba, Repentance Brings Forgiveness For Even the Vilest Sin

This is the story of a man who lusted for what he should not have seen. It is a story of sin that spiraled out of control.

King David was a man after God’s own heart, a good man who trusted God in all situations. He was surrendered to God’s will. He was a musician and wrote songs praising the Lord. Yet he lusted after a woman he should not look upon – Bathsheba, a beautiful woman married to one of his elite military commanders, Uriah the Hittite. David saw her bathing, and he sent for her, committed adultery with her, and she became pregnant.

David tried to cover his tracks by summoning her husband Uriah, who was away at war. He assumed Uriah would sleep with Bathsheba, and it would look like he was the father of the child.

However, Uriah refused to go home while the soldiers under his command were at war, and he slept outside the palace instead. David was so desperate to cover up his sin that he had Uriah sent to the front lines, where the battle was fiercest, so that he would be killed. And so he was. The sin of “lust of the eyes” spiraled down and down, and ended in murder.

“For everything in the world—the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life—comes not from the Father but from the world.” 1 John 2:16

Yet God called David “a man after my own heart.” How could he do this? How could this man of God fall to such depths of sin?

“I have found David the son of Jesse, a man after mine own heart, which shall fulfill all my will.” Acts 13:22b

There is no limit to the depths of sin a person is capable of once once he or she starts to walk away from God. Committing just one sin often makes people callous to bigger sins, until they find themselves doing things they never imagined they would do.” Dr. David Jeremiah

Dr. David Jeremiah

So the Lord sent Nathan the prophet to David. He said,

“There were two men in a certain town, one rich and the other poor. The rich man had a very large number of sheep and cattle,  but the poor man had nothing except one little ewe lamb he had bought. He raised it, and it grew up with him and his children. It shared his food, drank from his cup and even slept in his arms. It was like a daughter to him.”

Now a traveler came to the rich man, but the rich man refrained from taking one of his own sheep or cattle to prepare a meal for the traveler who had come to him. Instead, he took the ewe lamb that belonged to the poor man and prepared it for the one who had come to him.  

David burned with anger against the man and said to Nathan, “As surely as the Lord lives, the man who did this must die!  He must pay for that lamb four times over, because he did such a thing and had no pity.”

 Then Nathan said to David, “You are the man! (2 Samuel 12:1-7a)

The consequences of David’s sin were severe. The child born to him by Bathsheba became sick and died; and calamity never left David’s household.

Broken-hearted over what he had done, David cried out to the Lord, repented of his sins, and was forgiven. In his sorrow, David wrote Psalm 51.

“Cleanse me with hyssop, and I will be clean. Wash me and I will be whiter than snow.” (vs. 7)

“Create in me a pure heart, O God, and renew a steadfast spirit within me. Do not cast me from your presence or take your Holy Spirit from me.” (vs. 10-11)

“My sacrifice, O God, is a broken spirit; a broken and contrite heart you, God, will not despise.” (vs. 17)

Once forgiven, and the weight of his sin lifted, David wrote this Psalm:

 “The Lord is compassionate and gracious,
    slow to anger, abounding in love.
 He will not always accuse,
    nor will he harbor his anger forever;
 he does not treat us as our sins deserve
    or repay us according to our iniquities.
 For as high as the heavens are above the earth,
    so great is his love for those who fear him;
 as far as the east is from the west,
    so far has he removed our transgressions from us.” Psalm 103:8-12

David experienced the overwhelming power of God’s forgiveness and mercy – forgiveness for sins which were evil in the sight of the Lord. That forgiveness is an indescribable experience that leaves one changed forever. It brings with it a deep understanding of God’s mercy and love. It brings relief from shame, relief from guilt that is too heavy to carry. And it is available to us today.

The Apostle Paul said, “Thanks be to God for his indescribable gift”. 2 Corinthians 9:15

May we forever praise Him and bring glory to His Name.

Read the whole story from 2 Samuel here.

With Love, 

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This Is My Journey Unscripted.

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